What comes to mind when you hear the word “tractor”?

Fig. 1. Dog “Driving” a Fordson Tractor, circa 1919. THF135205. From the Collections of The Henry Ford. Gift of Ford Motor Company. Tractor. What comes to mind? Do you immediately conjure an image of a four-wheeled vehicle hitched to a plow? Do you picture a particular manufacturer? Think about horsepower? Link internal combustion engines to… Continue reading What comes to mind when you hear the word “tractor”?

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AIMA Conference in India – 13-18 October 2023

AIMA is pleased to announce the 20th triennial conference in India, with two hosts: Shoolini University, Solan, Himachal Pradesh; and Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab. The dates are 13, 14 and 15 October 2023 at Shoolini University and 16, 17, and 18 at Punjab Agricultural University which includes the oldest agricultural museum in Punjab, the… Continue reading AIMA Conference in India – 13-18 October 2023

Agriculture & the International Year of Glass 2022

Agriculture? Glass? What’s the connection? Fig. 1. Stained Glass Panel, Labours of the Months (October – breaking up clods and scattering wheat), 1450-1475, England. From Cassiobury Park, Hertfordshire. Source: Commons Wikimedia. Have you ever thought about how farmers and market gardeners care for “baby” plants, for example, by covering them with a glass cloche to… Continue reading Agriculture & the International Year of Glass 2022

Food Awareness & Loss 2022 AIMA Lecture Series

AIMA recognizes the International Day of World Awareness of Food Loss and Waste The International Association of Agricultural Museums (AIMA) invites you to a one-hour program via ZOOM. Speakers will address museum collections, policies, protocol, and programming aimed at increasing awareness of the numerous costs of food loss and waste. To join the event, please… Continue reading Food Awareness & Loss 2022 AIMA Lecture Series

World Donkey Day 2022 AIMA Lecture Series

Register now!Donkeys are an integral part of the culture, the history and the future in numerous countries in the world. Donkeys (and mules parented by donkeys) have been, and still are, important for agricultural production and marketing as well as for transport. Donkey traditions have been encapsulated in museums around the world, but donkey technologies… Continue reading World Donkey Day 2022 AIMA Lecture Series

Draft Animal Conformation

A Veterinarian’s Viewpoint. by Barbara Corson Of all the many tools that have shaped human cultures, harnessing* systems for domestic animals are among the most important. (*Note: Some people differentiate between harness and yokes, but in this article, harness is used in the sense of capturing or transmitting power, as one would “harness the energy… Continue reading Draft Animal Conformation

Risen from the Ruins with All-Wheel Drive – The Jeep in Agriculture

by Albert Kühnstetter The jeep in agricultural engineering after World War 2 – developments derived from it. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, and in the weeks and months that followed, many Jeeps landed on the European continent. The Jeep was the prototype of the off-road vehicle par excellence – a comparatively high speed on the… Continue reading Risen from the Ruins with All-Wheel Drive – The Jeep in Agriculture

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Draft Animals in the Past, Present and Future

Virtual Conference 8-9 May 2021. “Draft Animals in the Past, Present and Future” was piloted by AIMA President, Claus Kropp, now taking up the challenge of a world-wide effort to bring together draft animals users. The congress was virtual, and hosted by Lauresham Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Kloster… Continue reading Draft Animals in the Past, Present and Future

Jackstock Mules – a Presidential “Stomp” of Approval

Spotlight on Local Breeds This is the first in a series of articles contributed by Jeannette Beranger, of the Livestock Conservancy During the history of the development of livestock breeds in America, not many can claim its origin began with the vision of an American President. The American Mammoth Jackstock is one such breed. It… Continue reading Jackstock Mules – a Presidential “Stomp” of Approval

The Vallus, a 2000-year-old Gallo-Roman Harvesting Machine

Malagne, the Archeoparc of Rochefort, in Belgium (between Brussels and Luxemburg city), is an interpretation centre for rural Gallo-Roman civilization especially designed to highlight an important villa active in the early centuries of the Christian era in Northern Gaul. Malagne’s special mission is heritage protection, scientific research and mediation of this listed site and archaeological… Continue reading The Vallus, a 2000-year-old Gallo-Roman Harvesting Machine

Harvesting with a cart: Pliny’s vallus and Palladius’ vehiculum

An on-going saga in agricultural innovation. How can you harvest with a cart pushed backwards? This idea proposed by farmers in northern Gaul is original and unparalleled in the Roman era: it suffices to combine two implements, a cart (vehiculum) and a hand tool for cutting or stripping-off. The idea seems simple enough, but the… Continue reading Harvesting with a cart: Pliny’s vallus and Palladius’ vehiculum

The Amazing Impact of Furry and Feathered Interpreters

Jeannette Beranger joins us again for an article on her experiences in the United States in using animals as the star performers in audience contact. For nearly 20 years, I was in charge of a Heritage breed farmyard exhibit within a facility that enjoyed over a million visitors a year. It never ceased to amaze… Continue reading The Amazing Impact of Furry and Feathered Interpreters

The Ethnology of the Old Ways

Travels in Scotland c. 1720-1830. The Hunterian Museum in the University of Glasgow organized an exhibition in the summer of 2020, under the title ‘Old Ways and New Roads: Travels in Scotland c. 1720-1830’, presenting the results of a lengthy research project based in Glasgow University under the leadership of Professor Nigel Leask, Dr John… Continue reading The Ethnology of the Old Ways

How Much is a Banker Horse Worth?

Jeannette Beranger points out that a sad incident led to precise evaluation of the “value” of the Banker horses that attract millions of visitors a year to the islands off the eastern coast of the United States. American Livestock Breeds Conservancy staffers Alison Martin, Steve Moize, and Jeannette Beranger headed to the North Carolina (United… Continue reading How Much is a Banker Horse Worth?

“The Wagon Walk”

“The Wagon Walk” at the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) in Reading. Wagon enthusiasts will have much to see and enjoy at The MERL. The strength of collections, whether objects, books, records or photographic archives, is outstanding, fully deserving of their Designated Status. Very rarely do objects and related archives come together quite so… Continue reading “The Wagon Walk”

Donkeys, The Helpmeet Of Humankind In Pharaonic Egypt

Donkeys had long been domesticated in ancient Egypt and may have come from the family of Equus africanus known in Nubia. An illustration painted on a pre-dynastic (ca. 3000 BCE) schist plaque shows a donkey among the booty taken in Libya. The Egyptians used donkeys as pack animals and they were among the livestock of… Continue reading Donkeys, The Helpmeet Of Humankind In Pharaonic Egypt

The Learning Curve At Lauresham Open-Air Laboratory

– from oxen to old swine breed. Preparing the field for winter crops. A team of two Raetian Grey Oxen at the Lauresham Open Air Laboratory in Germany is ploughing one of the fields with a (re)constructed Early Medieval ard. In Lauresham various medieval field types (e.g. ridge and furrow) and systems (e.g. three-field crop rotation)… Continue reading The Learning Curve At Lauresham Open-Air Laboratory