Did anybody care about, or for, bees in the European Middle Ages?

Abstract: Medieval texts and iconography have much to tell us about beekeeping in Europe, from how hives were constructed to who took care of them, and… for whom. Résumé: Les textes et l’iconographie du Moyen Âge en Europe recèlent une pléthore d’informations sur l’apiculture, sur les ruches, sur qui s’en occupait et… pour qui. Keywords:Honeybees… Continue reading Did anybody care about, or for, bees in the European Middle Ages?

How has beekeeping changed over time? An archaeobeekeeper and an archaeological open-air museum in Germany showcase pre- and proto-historic beekeeping methods

Abstracts: Archaeological finds provide proof of beekeeping in man-made places for bees to live in for the first sedentary cultures. Tubular wooden constructions (log hives) and skeps are the typical bee habitations for (pre-)historic beekeepingin Central Europe. Only two really groundbreaking changes can be pointed out that have led to the modern type of beehives… Continue reading How has beekeeping changed over time? An archaeobeekeeper and an archaeological open-air museum in Germany showcase pre- and proto-historic beekeeping methods

What can law do for bees? A touch of history

Abstracts: We have evidence for honey-gathering from rock art dating back to the Mesolithic, but there is also information about beekeeping in the context of laws (and literature) in early Ireland – what do you do when a neighbour’s bees invade your property? Worse still, what happens if one stings you? Even worse, what happens… Continue reading What can law do for bees? A touch of history

Why all the buzz about bees? AIMA bloggers encourage us to Bee Aware!

Bees – one short name accounts for 16,000 to 20,000 species of hairy flying insects classified into seven families. All live within social communities that depend on strict work routines. They all seek the same food sources – pollen and nectar – and each processes their harvest and preserves it in hives built in the… Continue reading Why all the buzz about bees? AIMA bloggers encourage us to Bee Aware!

AIMA Executive Board gathers in New Delhi, India

Board members of the Association Internationale Des Musées D’Agriculture (AIMA) met for their annual meeting in New Delhi, India, November 25-30, 2018. Surajit Sarkar, Ambedkar University, coordinated the visit. Nerupama Y. Modwel, director of  Intangible Cultural Heritage Division of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) greeted AIMA board members on November 26 at… Continue reading AIMA Executive Board gathers in New Delhi, India

Rural History 2019

Rural History 2019, the fourth biennial conference of the European Rural History Organisation, will take place in Paris from Tuesday 10 to Friday 13 September 2019. For information about the conference – which incorporates numerous topics of interest to agricultural museums.

American Literature and Agricultural Lessons

I’m pulling a panel together for Rural History 2017 (Leuven, Belgium, 11-14 September) on the following topic: American literature with rural or agricultural content taught in European schools. If you studied an American novel in school in Europe (grades before university) please post the author, title and brief summary of how the literature was included… Continue reading American Literature and Agricultural Lessons

Rural History 2017

Call for Panels Rural History 2017 11-14 September 2017 Leuven, Belgium It is a pleasure to announce Rural History 2017, the third biennial conference of the European Rural History Organisation (EURHO). The EURHO conferences aim at promoting the exchange of research questions and results, fostering co-operation between scholars engaged in the history of rural Europe… Continue reading Rural History 2017